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Music is as effective as drugs at calming nerves ahead of surgery - study

23/07/2019

Most people feel nervous ahead of surgery, even if the procedure they’re about to undergo is straightforward. To calm these nerves, patients are often given medication. But a new study suggests that music could be just as effective. According to a study conducted by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania, a special song written to reduce anxiety, blood pressure and heart rate performed as well as a sedative for calming patients ahead of surgery. For the trial, 157 surgery patients were either given the drug midazolam or play the so-called “world’s most relaxing song”, Weightless by UK band Marconi Union, while they were being given an anaesthetic to numb a part of their body. Patient anxiety was equally reduced in both groups, suggesting the music was an effective alternative to the drugs. The great news about this is the music medicine is both free and completely safe, whereas the drugs cost money and can have side effects. Speaking about the findings of the research, Dr Veena Graff, assistant professor of anaesthesiology and critical care at the University Of Pennsylvania Perelman School Of Medicine, said: “Music lights up the emotional area of the brain, the reward system and the pleasure pathways. “It means patients can be in their own world, they can be comfortable and have full control.” Intrigued what the world’s most relaxing song sounds like? Listen to it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2JNM-xPZXgI

Cancer-killing cold virus could offer new hope in the fight against bladder cancer

09/07/2019

A small study in the UK has found an unlikely ally in a strain of the common cold virus in the fight against bladder cancer. For the study, the findings of which appear in the journal Clinical Cancer Research, 15 patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer were intravenously given coxsackievirus (CVA21) ahead of scheduled surgery to remove their tumours. Post-surgery, when tissue samples were examined, there were signs the virus had targeted and killed cancer cells in the bladder. Furthermore, after the cancer cells had been killed, the virus reproduced and targeted other cancer cells. All other healthy cells were left intact. “The virus gets inside cancer cells and kills them by triggering an immune protein - and that leads to signalling of other immune cells to come and join the party,” said study leader Prof Hardev Pandha, from the University of Surrey and Royal Surrey County Hospital. The researchers from the University of Sussex who carried out the study said their findings could “help revolutionise treatment” for bladder cancer and reduce the risk of it recurring. Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer is the 10th most common cancer in the UK and affects around 10,000 new people every year. At present, treatments are either invasive, or cause toxic side effects. Moreover, constant, costly monitoring is required to ensure the cancer has not returned. Bladder cancer costs the NHS more per patient than any other cancer because of its high rate of recurrence.

New MRI scan being trialled for prostate cancer screening

13/06/2019

Hundreds of men in the UK are trialling a new prostate cancer screening scan to see if it could eventually be offered on the NHS. Right now, there is no routine prostate cancer screening performed in the UK. Blood tests and biopsies are the most reliable ways to determine if a man has prostate cancer. The new test involves a non-invasive MRI scan that checks the inside of the body for any abnormal growths. It will be a few years yet before we know if the new scan is better than the current blood tests, scientists say, but NHS England is, nevertheless, hailing the breakthrough as a “potentially exciting development”. In the UK alone, prostate cancer claims the lives of around 11,800 men every year. It usually develops slowly, so there are often no associated signs or symptoms for many years. Prostate cancer treatment depends on its development. Doctors may suggest to monitor the situation first, while surgery and radiotherapy will be advised for others. Speaking about the new test, Karen Stalbow, from Prostate Cancer UK, said: “This trial could provide an exciting step towards our ambition for a national screening programme that enables men to get the early prostate cancer diagnosis that can save more lives.”

Robotic angioplasty at Pasteur Clinic in Toulouse

19/04/2019

The Pasteur Clinic has achieved a 1st in Europe   The Pasteur Clinic of Toulouse announces having achieved a European first in the field of cardiology thanks to the robotic pathway. Dr. Jean Fajadet thus performed the first coronary angioplasty in Europe under the assistance of a robot.   In the case of narrowing or occlusion of the arteries, created by deposits of atheromatous plaques, the cardiologist may recommend coronary angioplasty. This procedure consists of positioning a small balloon in the artery at the level of the narrowing or occlusion and inflating it to dilate the stenosis and crush the atheromatous plaque and thus obtain a normal flow in the coronary artery. In general, the following is stent placement, a mini-spring, which prevents the artery to reseal. The Pasteur Clinic has been performing this intervention for more than 30 years in interventional cardiology, percutaneously under local anesthesia.     With the acquisition of the robot (CorPath GRX System® Corindus®), the cardiologist can perform his act via joysticks. The robot is guided from a control room. It allows a great precision of the gesture and the absence of X-ray exposure for the personnel.   The Pasteur Clinic has also invested in a 4th generation da Vinci xi surgical robot for several specialties (urology, gynecology, digestive, thoracic surgery, etc.).   Source: La Depeche 

A low-carb diet may help relieve symptoms of knee osteoarthritis

28/03/2019

If you or someone you know suffers with knee osteoarthritis, a new study may provide some hope. One of the most widespread forms of arthritis in the United States, osteoarthritis affects around 10% of men and 13% of women over the age of 60. Moreover, some estimates say it affects almost 40% of people over the age of 70. What’s worse is there is currently no cure, with doctors and medical professionals usually prescribing painkillers to help alleviate symptoms. Knee replacement surgery is also an option that’s considered. However, a new study led by Robert Sorge, Ph.D., who is the director of the PAIN Collective in the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Psychology, has found that a diet low in carbohydrates could help relieve knee osteoarthritis symptoms. Having followed either a low-carb or low-fat diet for 12 weeks, the 21 adults aged 65–75 who had knee osteoarthritis and participated in the study were examined to see what the effect had been. The participants’ functional pain levels were analyzed, as well as their serum blood levels for oxidative stress, both at the beginning of the study and at the end. Participants that followed the low-carb diet had reduced functional pain levels and levels of self-reported pain. Furthermore, they also showed less oxidative stress in their serum blood levels. Speaking about the findings of the study, Sorge said: “Our work shows [that] people can reduce their pain with a change in diet.”

Replacement hips and knees last as long as 25 years - study

19/02/2019

Hip and knee replacements last much longer than previously thought, according to a large-scale study from the UK. It’s a reality that will help both patients and surgeons determine when it is the right time to perform surgery. The study conducted by the University of Bristol analysed 25 years’ worth of operations data involving more than 500,000 patients. It found that eight out of 10 knee replacements (80%) and six out of 10 hip replacements (60%) last as long as 25 years. Until now, little has been known about the true success and longevity of replacement hips and knees – despite them being two of the most common forms of surgery carried out on the NHS. Previously, doctors have been unable to provide accurate estimates as to how long a patient’s replacement hip or knee might last. Now, they are in a much better position to give confident answers when questioned. Speaking about the findings of the research, which were published in The Lancet, Dr Jonathan Evans, orthopaedic registrar, lead study author and research fellow at Bristol Medical School, said: “At best, the NHS has only been able to say how long replacements are designed to last, rather than referring to actual evidence from multiple patients' experiences of joint replacement surgery. “Given the improvement in technology and techniques in the last 25 years, we expect that hip or knee replacements put in today may last even longer.” Follow these links to find out more about minimally invasive hip replacement surgery and minimally invasive knee surgery in France.

Glowing chemical could make brain tumour surgery safer

06/11/2018

Patients with aggressive brain tumours could benefit from improved surgery outcomes by drinking a substance that makes their cancer glow pink, a trial suggests. For the trial, scientists gave patients with suspected glioma (a type of tumor that occurs in the brain and spinal cord) a drink containing 5-ALA, a substance that accumulates in fast-growing cancer cells and makes them glow pink. The hope is that the glowing tumours will be easier for surgeons to safely remove, as they can be more easily distinguished from healthy brain tissue. Glioma is the most common type of brain cancer and treatment usually involves removing as much of the tumour as possible. The prognosis for patients, however, is usually poor. Speaking about the trial, Dr Kathreena Kurian, study author and associate professor in brain tumour research at the University of Bristol, said: “There's an urgent need to have something while the patient is on the table, while the neurosurgeon is operating, which will guide them to find the worst bits. “The beauty of 5-ALA is that they can see where high-grade glioma is, while they're operating.” The results of the trial have not yet been published, but were presented at the 2018 NCRI Cancer Conference in Glasgow over the weekend. The next step, the researchers say, is to test 5-ALA in children with brain tumours.

France Surgery and Sancheng Digital sign partnership

17/09/2018

Sancheng Digital, Europe to China marketing company and France Surgery, France's leading medical tourism company signed a partnership deal this week. The signing took place at TBSeeds - Toulouse Business School's start-up incubator.   (Sancheng Digital and France Surgery have strong links to Toulouse Business School, the founders of both companies having studied at the institution.)  Chinese outbound medical tourism is growing year on year as Chinese consumers seek to access medical treatment unavailable to them in their home country. Hanya Cao co-founder Sancheng Digital: "Sancheng Digital are excited to be working hand in hand with France Surgery to enable them to strengthen their position in the Chinese market." Carine HILAIRE co-founder France Surgery: "Sancheng Digital's expertise in China focused marketing made them a perfect business partner for France Surgery in our quest to build strong relationships with Chinese clients." Annexe: “Chinese outbound tourism figures continue to grow. Estimates show 500,000 outbound Chinese medical travellers spend at least $10 billion a year, lucrative for medical tourism destinations in Southeast Asia, Europe and the USA.” https://www.imtj.com/news/130m-chinese-holiday-abroad-outbound-medical-tourists-estimated-05m/ Sancheng Digital和France Surgery签署战略合作协议      2018年9月11日,Sancheng Digital 和 France Surgery 在法国图卢兹商学院创业孵化中心签署了一项重要合作协议。Sancheng Digital立足法国南部,致力于中欧贸易合作和国际市场营销服务。在协议签署后, France Surgury 将在其助力下进一步打开中国境外医疗旅游市场。     据报道,随着中国经济稳步增长,中国出境医疗旅游市场也成为各国看好的新蓝海。医疗体检和疗养旅游深受中国中产阶级青睐,除此之外,在癌症等恶性疾病治疗领域,欧美等国往往拥有更充足的医疗资源和更先进的研发治疗手段,因此也吸引着越来越多的中国患者前往海外接受治疗。      France Surgery的创始人凯莉.希拉里 (Carine HILAIRE) 说: "目前我们已经为许多来自欧美,中东,北非地区的病患提供了系列帮助,中国将会是我们的下一站,很高兴我们能和Sancheng Digital成为战略合作伙伴,相信在他们的支持下,我们能更好的了解中国病人的需求,推广法国的医疗旅游品牌,帮助更多中国病患在法国接受相关治疗,重获健康。"

How computers are being used to fight cholera in Yemen

30/08/2018

Computers and technology have been revolutionising the healthcare industry for many years. Whether it’s something simple like managing patient records or super-advanced robot-assisted surgery, computers and technology are now engrained in all aspects of medical care. Now, exciting and much-needed progress is being made (using computers) to tackle the cholera epidemic in Yemen. The computer system predicts where outbreaks will occur, allowing aid workers to focus their efforts on prevention in advance. As a result, the number of new cases has plummeted. Last year, a staggering 50,000 new cholera cases were reported in Yemen in just one week. This year, that number has dropped considerably to 2,500. The system - the implementation of which was coordinated by the UK's Department for International Development - monitors rainfall and identifies areas where sewage systems are likely to be overwhelmed, leading to the infection spreading. The forecasts are used, sometimes up to four weeks in advance, to deploy Unicef resources on the ground to potential cholera hotspots, where they distribute hygiene kits, jerrycans and chlorine tablets. Speaking about the new computer system, Prof Charlotte Watts, chief scientific adviser at the UK Department for International Development, said: “What this technology enables us to do is really home in to where we're going to get new outbreaks, and respond really effectively.”

France Surgery Visit to China

19/07/2018

C H E N G D U   H E A L T H   S E R V I C E    C H A M B E R   O F   C O M M E R C E    &      S A N Y I   M E D I C A L    C E N T R E   &   C H I N A   I N T E R N A T I O N A L   M E D I C A L    T O U R I S M   F A I R       O U R    D E L E G A T I O N    The French Medical & Health Delegation, comprised of Dr. Marc Giraud, co-founder of France Surgery and Dr. Jean-Patrick Lajonchère, the President of Hôpital Saint Joseph in Paris, travelled to Chengu, China earlier this month.  They were welcomed by Mr. SHI JUN, President of the Chengdu Health Service Industry Chamber of Commerce, together with representatives of JustGood Health Industry Group, Sichuan Southwest International Medical equipment city and Chengdu Yukang hospital.    This was a good opportunity to bound the Franco-Chinese partnership related to the medical and health industry, that was signed last November in Paris, when France Surgery, together with Mr. Philippe Douste-Blazy and the Hôpital Saint Joseph welcomed the Chinese delegation.   The Chinese tour also comprised a visit at the China International Medical Tourism (Chengdu) Fair and to the Sanyi Medical Center, where we've met esteemed professionals and future collaborators!  

Prostate cancer deaths outnumber those from breast cancer for first time in UK

06/02/2018

New figures show that for the first time ever the number of men dying from prostate cancer in the UK has overtaken female deaths from breast cancer. While lung and bowel cancer remain the top cancer killers, prostate cancer is now third, according to figures released by Prostate Cancer UK. In 2015, 11,819 men died from prostate cancer, compared to 11,442 women from breast cancer – a reality that Prostate Cancer UK says is due to advances in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. The charity says that the UK’s aging population is one of the reasons why more men are developing and dying from prostate cancer. Angela Culhane, chief executive of Prostate Cancer UK, said prostate cancer survival rates could be increased by developing better diagnostic tests and using them to form a nationwide screening programme. At present, there is no single, reliable test for prostate cancer. Also, men with the disease can live for decades without showing any symptoms. Those most at risk are men with male relatives who have had the disease, black men and men aged over 50. Ms Culhane said: “It's incredibly encouraging to see the tremendous progress that has been made in breast cancer over recent years. “The good news is that many of these developments could be applied to prostate cancer and we're confident that with the right funding, we can dramatically reduce deaths within the next decade.” You can find out more about prostate cancer treatment with us here at France Surgery by visiting the oncology section of our website and selecting the prostate cancer link.

UK’s most Googled health questions of 2017 revealed

21/12/2017

Have you ever turned to Dr Google when you’ve been feeling under the weather? If you have, you’re not alone. Nowadays, tons of people research symptoms they’re experiencing on the world’s largest search engine. But while many of these searches confirm that the searcher is suffering from a common cold, others can see a simple sore throat query spiral off into diagnosing all sorts of rare conditions. It’s a reality that makes Googling health conditions both convenient and potentially terrifying. As the year draws to a close, the team at Google Trends has released information on the most popular heath questions people in the UK asked the search engine in 2017. Topping the list is the rather generic “why do I feel sick?” search. That’s followed by “why am I always tired?” and “what is cancer?” Have you ever heard of lupus? It seems many people have and want to know more about it, as “what is lupus?” is fourth on the list. This could be because pop icon Selena Gomez was diagnosed with lupus in 2015 and underwent surgery for the condition over the summer. Lupus is an autoimmune disease that causes sufferers to feel fatigued, have swollen or painful joints, and skin irritation or rashes. Because lupus is an autoimmune disease it is not contagious. More information about lupus, including warning signs, can be found on the NHS website. The final question completing the top five is “what is sepsis?” Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that can be triggered by an infection and leads to the body attacking its own organs and tissues. Sepsis can be treated with antibiotics if it is caught early enough and hasn’t already damaged any vital organs. More information about sepsis, including warning signs, can be found on the NHS website.

Revolutionary pen detects cancer in just 10 seconds

12/09/2017

When it comes to diagnosing cancer, speed has always been of the essence. But now a new handheld device, which looks very much like a pen, can identify cancerous tissue in just 10 seconds. Its inventors say that tests have shown it to be accurate 96% of the time. According to scientists at the University of Texas, the device could make surgery to remove tumours faster, safer and more precise. Furthermore, they say the pen would significantly reduce the chances of leaving any cancerous tissue behind, avoiding the “heartbreak” that such a situation brings. The internal chemistry of cancer cells is very different to that of healthy tissue. That’s because their unique metabolism makes them strive to grow and spread furiously, and that’s what the MasSpec Pen, as it’s known, uses to identify them. When touched onto a piece of tissue, the pen releases a tiny droplet of water. Chemicals inside the living cells pass into the water droplet, which is then sucked back up inside the pen for analysis. Within seconds, doctors know whether they are looking at healthy or cancerous tissue. It’s thought the pen will greatly help surgeons find the border between healthy and cancerous tissue, allowing them to remove all of the cancer. Dr James Suliburk, head of endocrine surgery at Baylor College of Medicine and one of the researchers, said: "Any time we can offer the patient a more precise surgery, a quicker surgery or a safer surgery, that's something we want to do. "This technology does all three." 

Zika virus could be used to treat aggressive brain cancers, say US scientists

07/09/2017

The harmful Zika virus, which is spread by mosquitoes and causes devastating brain damage in babies, could be used to treat aggressive brain cancer in adults, according to US scientists. Up until now, Zika has only been seen as a major global health threat, but the new research could see it become a remedy. The scientists say the virus can be used to selectively infect and destroy hard-to-treat cancerous cells in adult brains. In mice studies, the Zika virus was seen to successfully shrink aggressive tumours, yet left other brain cells unscathed. While human trials are still quite a way off, laboratory tests show that the virus works on human cells, and experts believe the Zika virus holds a huge amount of potential. They say it could be injected into a human brain at the same time as surgery to remove life-threatening tumours. Some brain cancers are fast growing and spread quickly through the brain. This makes it very difficult to see where the tumour finishes and healthy tissue begins. As an extra precaution, the team from Washington University School of Medicine and the University of California San Diego School of Medicine have already begun modifying the Zika virus to make it less potent than the regular strain. Researcher Dr Michael Diamond said: "It looks like there's a silver lining to Zika. This virus that targets cells that are very important for brain growth in babies, we could use that now to target growing tumours."

Speed boosts pancreatic cancer surgery success rates

03/08/2017

A pilot scheme in the UK has shown that speeding up access to surgery for pancreatic cancer patients diagnosed early enough boosted success rates by a third. The team from the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust that conducted the trial reduced the time to surgery for 32 patients from two months to just over two weeks. All but one had their tumours successfully removed. However, it will be two years before anyone knows if operating sooner extends lives. Nevertheless, the team said it had saved the NHS £3,200 per patient and could help hundreds of patients all over the UK. Very little progress has been made in treating pancreatic cancer since the early 1970s. Around 9,600 people in the UK are diagnosed with it each year, of which just 7% will live beyond five years.  At present, only 8% of pancreatic cancer patients in the UK undergo surgery to remove their tumours. That’s because the majority are diagnosed too late and surgery is no longer an option. Keith Roberts, who led the team from Birmingham, said: “We have shown that it is possible to create a much faster path to surgery for pancreatic cancer patients within the NHS, which could have a significant impact on survival. “We carried out surgery earlier, avoided unpleasant and costly pre-surgery treatment, and yet there was no significant increase in complications post-surgery.”

Increasing number of millenials undergoing cosmetic surgery to create dimples

25/07/2017

While cosmetic surgery is nothing new, a new craze among millenials is definitely garnering some attention at the moment. It’s called dimpleplasty and it basically involves having facial surgery to create dimples. Okay, so most people would agree that dimples are attractive, but isn’t having them artificially created going one step too far? The procedure, which costs as little as $800 and takes just half an hour to perform, has grown in popularity over the past few years. According to Wright Jones, a plastic surgeon from Atlanta, the main reason dimpleplasty is so popular is because of the “little downtime, enhancement of facial aesthetics, and lack of need for general anaesthesia”. Surgeons create a defect in the patient’s cheek muscle which is then reattached to the under surface of the skin. When the patient smiles, they miraculously have dimples. But the surgery isn’t permanent. It last for one to two months – is that long enough to justify the swelling and soreness that accompanies it?

Simple blood test can detect cancer years before symptoms appear

08/06/2017

A simple blood test that accurately detects several different types of cancer years before symptoms even appear could revolutionise how the disease is treated, scientists have said. Researchers hope the non-invasive test will pave the way for a future where the straightforward procedure could form part of routine health check-ups. It’s thought that thousands of deaths each year could be prevented with the tests as they can detect tumours at an early stage, when treatment is most effective. At present, the best method for detecting cancer is a biopsy, which involves cutting out a small piece of tumour tissue for lab analysis. However, biopsies are invasive and often painful, and a person already needs to have a tumour or at least a suspected tumour to have something cut out of it. That’s why scientists have been working to develop blood tests that can do the same, without the need for surgery. Speaking about the breakthrough, Dr Bert Vogelstein, a professor of oncology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, told The Guardian: “It’s fair to say that if you could detect all cancers while they are still localized, you could diminish cancer deaths by 90 per cent.”

France Surgery once again triumphant at the IMTJ Awards

02/05/2017

This year's International Medical Travel Journal (IMTJ) Awards were held on April 26 in the beautiful town of Opatija, Croatia on the Adriatic coast. France Surgery had been nominated in the 'Best use of technology in medical tourism' category, so a small team travelled from France to Croatia to attend the awards ceremony. The best use of technology category recognises companies that have "developed or demonstrated innovative technology in healthcare enabling technology or applications, or for the innovative use of existing technology in health management to the benefit of the international patient." And it's with great pleasure and much honour that we can reveal that we won! Shown above accepting our award are France Surgery co-founders Carine Hilaire, Françoise Loesch and Dr. Marc Giraud, together with Keith Pollard, the Managing Director of International Medical Travel Journal. We’d like to take this opportunity to say a huge thank you to all our patients and everyone who has helped contribute to our success. Facilitating world-class medical procedures here in France and providing the best recovery services available is our passion, and it's so rewarding to be recognised (again) by the IMTJ. You can find out more information about the IMTJ Awards on the official website here.

The local surgery app that could help save lives in Africa

14/03/2017

It is hoped that a new mobile app developed in Canada could help treat millions of patients in Africa. MOST, or mobile optimised skill training, is an application that can be accessed on a tablet or smartphone which helps accelerate the number of healthcare workers that can be taught essential surgical skills. The brainchild of Vancouver-based surgeon and UBC surgical professor Dr. Ronald Lett, MOST was brought to life by Surrey, B.C. tech company Conquer Mobile and will be provided by the Canadian Network for International Surgery (CNIS) for free. Unlike existing face-to-face courses, which are usually taught by doctors visiting Africa to limited groups, MOST will facilitate the sharing of skills in the community long after visiting teams have left.  At present, there are 5 mobile training courses available in MOST, but another 7 are planned for the future. The new technology will be used to train 25,000 African healthcare workers and treat 2 million patients over the next 3 years. [caption id="attachment_3741" align="alignnone" width="620"] Dr. Ronald Lett has been teaching surgical skills to healthcare workers in Sub-Saharan Africa for 22 years. (Image credit: Ronald Lett)[/caption]   "The problem is there is a huge demand for surgical education, limited funding, and therefore we feel that we can optimize training, by having it available using newer technology," said Lett. African healthcare workers will be able to download the app onto their smartphone or tablet and go through the academic knowledge part using games and skills questions. There will also be avatars which react and provide feedback as though the individual were practising on a real life patient. Today, women in Africa are 10 times more likely to die in childbirth than women in the Americas. Furthermore, 13% of Africans will die as a result of an injury. The MOST app will be tested by CNIS in Ethiopia and Rwanda this spring or early summer.

France Surgery Named as Finalists at Upcoming IMTJ Awards

02/03/2017

In 2015, France Surgery was named ‘Medical Travel Agency of the Year' at the International Medical Travel awards. Last year, we were a finalist in the ‘Best Marketing Initiative’ category. Now, it's with great pleasure that we can announce we've been nominated once again at the IMTJ Medical Travel Awards 2017, which is scheduled to take place at the Design Hotel Royal, Opatija, Croatia on the evening of April 26th this year. This year, France Surgery is being recognised in the 'Best Use of Technology in Medical Tourism' category, which the IMTJ website describes as: "Awarded to an organisation that has developed or demonstrated innovative technology in healthcare enabling technology or applications, or for the innovative use of existing technology in health management to the benefit of the international patient. Entries will be accepted from clinics, hospitals, hospital groups, medical travel agencies and facilitators, and organisations providing technology services to the medical travel industry.  The judges will be looking for objective evidence of success that can be attributed to the initiative. Supporting information should include evidence of the benefits provided to the medical travel sector." We'll be up against stiff competition, but hoping for a positive result when we head to Croatia next month. You can find out more about the IMTJ Medical Travel Awards, including information about all the categories, on the official website.

France Surgery exhibits at the China Workshop in Paris

28/02/2017

Last Wednesday, France Surgery proudly exhibited at the fourth edition of the China Workshop in Paris. The event, which was held at the Hotel du Collectionneur, saw hundreds of French exhibitors and Chinese visitors brought together under one roof to promote tourism opportunities in France for Chinese nationals. While Europe has always been a popular destination for Chinese tourists, the China Workshop presents a unique opportunity for French companies and Chinese tour operators to get in contact and develop mutual business relationships. France Surgery spent the day forging new business partnerships and promoting France as a medical tourism destination for Chinese nationals. The China Workshop was a fantastic opportunity for us to speak face-to-face with people interested in our services and provide them with detailed information about the medical tourism opportunities that exist for them here in France. France Surgery is already looking forward to next year's China Workshop, which is sure to be another successful event. You can find out more about the event on the official China Workshop website.

Is It Time to Consider Shoulder Surgery?

28/12/2016

All of us experience a little pain from time to time. It's not unusual and can usually be treated with over the counter pain remedies. But if said pain and discomfort lingers; becomes too much to cope with; and interferes with your day-to-day life, it's time to consider your options. Many shoulder pains are the result of a breakdown of soft tissues in the joint, which can often happen to people who have jobs that involve lots of manual labour and people who play certain sports. Rotator cuff tears, tendonitis and arthritis are all typical causes of shoulder pain. Surgery becomes an option when the pain and discomfort you experience becomes too much to bear, and when it comes to shoulder pain you (usually) have several surgical options: Arthroscopic surgery - Where a tiny camera (arthroscope) is inserted through a small incision in your skin and used to examine or repair the shoulder joint tissues. Shoulder stabilisation surgery - Carried out to improve the stability and function of the shoulder joint and prevent recurring dislocations. Total shoulder replacement - Surgeons replace the ends of the damaged upper arm bone (humerus) and usually the shoulder bone (scapula) or cap them with artificial surfaces lined with plastic or metal and plastic. Reverse total shoulder replacement - In standard total shoulder replacement surgery, a metal ball is used to replace the head of the humerus. The socket of the shoulder is replaced with a high-strength plastic implant. With reverse total shoulder replacement surgery, the positions of the new ball and socket are 'reversed' and on the opposite sides of a normal shoulder. Advances in replacement parts mean that most will last a lifetime, but on average artificial joints have a lifespan of 10 to 20 years.

Man Born Without a Hand Undergoes 'World First' Surgery to Have New Limb Attached

26/12/2016

A 32-year-old man who was born without a left hand has received one from a deceased donor, in an operation that surgeons claim is a world first. The man, who is known as Piotr, was born with a congenital birth defect which caused him to be missing the limb, but following the 13-hour procedure in Poland he now has a left hand for the first time in his life. At present, Piotr only has the ability to move his fingers, but doctors are confident that this will improve over time. Adam Domanasiewicz, who headed up the operation at Wroclaw Medical University, Poland, said: "It is the first graft in the world of an upper limb onto an adult with this congenital defect. "We are talking about a man who lived 32 years without this member." Domanasiewicz added that the operation could open up exciting new possibilities to hundreds of thousands of people in the world born without limbs, whose only option up until now has been prostheses. Bones are joined using titanium plates and screws, in much the same way as broken bones are fixed. They should eventually heal together, but the plates remain in place to ensure stability. Key tendons and muscles are then connected before the blood vessels are finally joined. With time and expert after care, the donor hand will move with strength and dexterity, and will even feel warm to touch and heal itself when injured.   While hand transplants have been previously performed on patients whose own limbs have been amputated, Piotr's operation is the first involving a person with a congenital birth defect resulting in a missing limb.

Testimonials

21/12/2016

TESTIMONIALS Mr Philipp D.C.     Mr Peter A.   Dear Carine Thank you so much for calling!  We saw your card that you had dropped in. William is very happy with everything . Some ordinance documentation was dropped off with William . It was for the anti coagulation injection for the nurse . William had told me you were going to send him some post op instructions. We were not able to send emails from the hospital. He had sent you one when he arrived but was not able to go through. Many thanks for all your assistance. Your organisation has been superb . The hospital and staff have been exemplary. Best wishes Denny H.  December, 2016             Hello Carine,         Thank you so much for all you have done for us these past two weeks. Our trip has            been spectacular.         We do love Toulouse and are looking forward to coming back for our future                        medical needs. We really liked both Drs De Chevigne and Bournazou.           You are really remarkable and we so thank you for your professionalism,                        dedication and kindness.           Best wishes to you ,          Joyce and Bruce  May, 2016 Dear Carine,    I would like to say thank you SO very much for getting me an appointment with Dr. Delepine!    He was fantastic and he really made my situation so much better!    Without you that wouldn't have been possible. I really appreciate that you were helping me out.    I have now returned to the US and if things go accordingly to Dr. Delepine, I will be walking on my leg within a month and surgery thankfully won't be necessary.    Again, THANK YOU so much for everything.    Best,    Julia.    June, 2016   Thank you for your e-mail which is very kind and most appreciated. We are glad that France Surgery is doing well as you all deserve it by being genuine people with a caring attitude which is rare in these times. many thanks Deborah S.   The support you have given me during my medical stay in France was exceptional ! la Sauvegarde Clinic in Lyon is very professional and the medical staff was extremely helpful and comprehensive. Je suis tres impressionee! I want to thank you for your exceptional service and your attention always so punctual. Bien cordialement, Valerie S.   Going into hospital for an operation major or minor can be stressful but going into a hospital for an operation in a country where the language is not the same as your own can be even worse. Therefore when I learnt that I needed a cataract operation in March 2011, in France, I approached the process with some trepidation. However I took a deep intake of breathe and I attempted to get myself sorted out but the best I could achieve was an operation in September 2011. As I could barely see anything out of may left eye, my husband and I resorted to the internet to see if there xas an alternative and this was where encountered a company called France Surgery. They specialise in looking after people coming to France from overseas for operations/treatments and also nationals from other countries living in France. There is obviously a charge for their services but for us it was worth every centime. From the moment we made contact they were able to book me into a clinic for the operation before the end of April 2011 and accompanied me every stage of the way. 1. They attended all the initial consultations 2. They dealt with all the administration including invoices from the hospital 3 They booked my room for the operation and ensured that the nurses who would deal me spoke English 4. They checked with the surgeon after the operation that all gone okay and rang me to reassure me that all was well 5. They attended the post operative consultation and checked me out of the clinic 6. They also attended the final check-up with the consultant and finally provided me with all the follow-up paperwork and the invoices information. I would not hesitate to recommend this organisation to others Claudia D.   Dear Carine, It is with great pleasure that I take this opportunity to write to you to express my thanks for the very professional way that my operation for Carpal Tunnel Release was arranged and completed. Barry B. Likewise, I was very impressed with the Post Operation help given to me in collating all the necessary paper work from the Hospital, to enable me to follow up my claim with my Medical Insurers. I personally would not hesitate in using France Surgery in the future and would most definitely recommend your services to my family and friends. Kind regards Barry B.     Hi Carine Thanks for your e-mail and Dr Giraud's report. Many thanks also for your support before and during our stay here, I do not know how we would have managed without you. Denise is leaving the Clinic tomorrow after lunch and we have decided to leave Montauban and head for home. Best wishes to you and France Surgery in the future. Thanks again Graham H.     Hi Carine ...Bernard & Dr Aebi, I am writing to thankyou for your help and the overall Surgery Package.You all gave me the the very best attention..seeing to my every requirement. the Hospital and nursing staff were excellent as was the Physiotherapist. I couldn't have had a kinder... more encouraging and kind Surgeon than Dr Aebi, he came to see me, usually at least once..sometimes two or three times each day,always showing me more that I could achieve every day ! I am walking very well...a little discomfort...not a problem though.I am pleased with my progress and see improvement on a weekly basis now. Many Thanks, Paul M.     Hello Carine, I am now back at Callac and I have to say a massive thank you for organising the treatment. Compared to England it was exceptional and with some careful planning I consider you could develop a really successful business. The Doctor gave me his medical opinion and referred me back to my own doctor in England for the correct medical (cf. surgical) treatment. He sent a message and the report has been posted to England, Many Thanks Rod D.     This E Mail is to confirm that I recently had a new Knee replacement at Clinique du Pont de Chaume. I have a house in France and wanted the surgery here as I believe the Hospitals cleaner and medicine better than in the UK. Carine at France Surgery took over all the paper work to ensure the proceedure was paid for by EHIC and I was required to pay only for France Suregery fees and cost of Private faciilities in the Hospital. I was met at the Hospital and was releived to be cared for by France Surgery who took me around from Anaesthetist to X ray and finally to my appointment with the surgeon Dr G. The Hospital was clean and Dr G. was an exceedinglky competent man who gave me full confidence. I was met again at the Hospital when i was admitted and France Surgery helped me find my room and presented me with some essentials for my stay. The Proceedure went perfectlly and I was able to leave Hospital 5 days later. France Surgery had arranged for me to have Physiotherapy and I went along some 20 times. I went back 1 month later for X rays and to be re checked by Dr G. I am very happy with France Surgery and would be delighted to use them again should I need further Surgery in France, I would be happy to talk to anyone wishing to talk aout my experience with France Surgery/the proceedure Kind regards Anthony E   La contencion y el acompañamiento fueron muy importante porque nos hicieron sentir en familia. El gerente del hotel puso el hotel a nueztra disposicion mostrando buen añimo en todo momento. Tiene ademas un trato excellente y hâbla 4 idiomas. La cercania del hotel tambien fue importante. En la clinica tanto la cama del paciente, como la del acompañante be desarmaron en dos oportunidades. Es necesariomas profesionales de haber hispana o inglesa. Por el equipo France SURGERY y el equipo médico, apartir de ahora los consideramos parte de nuestra familia ¡ Marcos S.   Estimada Carine: Al saludarte, quería informarte que el regreso fue muy bueno, la asistencia en los aeropuertos fue muy puntual y eficaz.durante el vuelo de Amsterdam a San Pablo me dieron la primera fila con lo cual no tuve problemas con mi pierna, el servicio a bordo de KLM es excelente, mi recuperación va progresando No me resta sino agradecer tus servicios en Francia, los cuales fueron de la más alta calidad profesional sin olvidar la calidez humana fundamental en estos casos. Cualquier cosa en la que pueda serte de utilidad estoy a tu disposición Hasta pronto Carlos A.

France Surgery Partner, La Clinique Turin, Installs New da Vinci Xi Surgical Robot

14/12/2016

La Clinique Turin, one of France Surgery's partners, becomes one of the first private establishments in the Paris region to install the new da Vinci Xi surgical robot. Dr. Olivier Dumonceau , a urologist surgeon of the La Clinique Turin in Paris, performed the first prostatectomy procedure in a private center in the Paris region using the new da Vinci Xi robot. This new generation of the da Vinci robotic surgical system allows for even more precise gestures for patient safety and helps obtain better intervention results. Surgeons benefit from improved 3D vision and increased movement accuracy with this new generation of surgical robot. Dr Olivier Dumonceau said: "This new generation of surgical robot marks an additional step of technology for the patient and surgeon. Our gestures are even safer, the patient can benefit from more precise surgery. We are now developing ambulatory robotic surgery for interventions that previously required several days of hospitalisation. Patient recovers faster and can leave the hospital quickly and safely. " Dr. Perrine Goyer, a digestive surgeon at the La Clinique Turin, added: "Robotic surgery offers today opportunities for minimally invasive surgery in new areas such as obesity surgery and digestive cancer for the most complex cases." Dr. Ludovic Friederich, gynecologist surgeon at the La Clinique Turin, said: "With this latest generation of machines, robotic surgery opens new perspectives for the treatment of endometriosis in very short stay with lightened suites. In particular, there is a reduction in postoperative pain." "Our development towards minimally invasive surgery and shorter hospital stays is strategic. The replacement of our previous robot with this new technology is a huge step forward. "The possibilities for interventions are now extended to pathologies as diverse as Prostatectomy, endometriosis or digestive surgery with an even higher level of result. The treatment can be performed on an outpatient basis without compromising the quality," said Stéphane Lievain, director of La Clinique Turin. La Clinique Turin carries out some 25,000 interventions per year. It features: 150 practitioners and offers complete care in surgery, medicine, dialysis and imaging (scanner, MRI and interventional radiology). Main specialties: urology, digestive, maxillofacial surgery, cardiology, ENT, orthopedics, vascular, plastic, gastroenterology, gynecology, nephrology. With a leading technical platform, it has 216 beds and places, 16 operating rooms as well as an intensive care unit in cardiology and a monitoring unit in the heart of Paris. It is regularly quoted in the health charts of the press.

Tiny-Armed Robot Could Revolutionise Surgical Procedures

13/12/2016

A tiny robot equipped with equally tiny tentacle-like instruments could soon revolutionise the way in which surgery is performed on people's eyes. Developed by UK-based Cambridge Consultants, the prototype Axsis robot will be able to provide a more accurate, minimally invasive way to conduct eye surgeries. The company behind the prototype has now released a video highlighting just how the delicate instrument can perform one of the world's most common surgical procedures: cataract surgery. Amazingly, the robot's movements are controlled using cables that are about the same width as a human hair, yet stronger by comparison than steel and Kevlar. Advanced sensing algorithms also minimise the risk of human error during operation. "By having a computer in the loop between when the surgeon’s moving their hands, and the robot moving, that computer can recognize when the surgeon is about to go outside and actually puncture the lens, for example, and stop that motion," said Chris Wagner, head of advanced surgical systems at Cambridge Consultants. It is thought that robots such as Axsis can improve treatments for both the surgeon and the patient. Check out Axsis in action in this amazing YouTube video.

The implant that reattaches the ears in 15 minutes

08/12/2016

                    The implant "Earfold" was tested on 7 year-old children, without any complication A new procedure to "reattach" certain ears, less invasive than conventional surgeries, is now available in France. If having peeled ears has no medical gravity, the people concerned can be the victims of mockery and afflicted with derogatory nicknames that can affect their psychological balance. Since last June, a metal implant created by Dr. Norbert Kang, an English surgeon, to correct this aesthetic defect, has been implemented in the French reconstructive surgery clinics. "An innovative technique" “Earfold”, the implant in question, is introduced under the skin thanks to a small incision in the anti-helix fold (cartilage that borders the hollow of the ear). The thin metal band made of nickel-titanium alloy (Nitinol), an elastic material used in vascular prostheses and unbreakable glasses frames, clings to the cartilage and immediately adopts its predefined shape by recreating the anti-helix crease which, when it does not exist, is responsible for some "peeling" of the ears. All people who can have a local anesthesia can benefit from this technique. It was tested on children of 7 year-old without any complication. On the other hand, it works only in individuals whose deformation is due to the absence or underdevelopment of the anti-helix fold. Individuals in whom detachment is caused by a deep shell (ear cavity) should go through more conventional and more complicated otoplasty procedures (ear surgery). In total, it is estimated that about 5% of the population is affected by detached ears, from all causes. "This technique is very innovative," says Dr. Michel Corniglion, a surgeon at the Saint-Charles Clinic in Lyon who carried out the first operation of this kind in France last June. "It has the advantage of being minimally invasive and the potential risks, such as hematomas and infections, are easily preventable if the surgeon meets the necessary hygiene conditions."

A Brief Guide to Hip Replacement Surgery

15/11/2016

Hip replacement surgery is a surgical procedure in which a surgeon removes portions of the hip joint that are arthritic or worn out and replaces them with artificial parts, often made from metal and plastic. It is a procedure that is often undertaken when other treatment options have failed to provide a satisfactory outcome. The result of hip replacement surgery is that the patient benefits from improved mobility, hip joint function and reduced/eliminated pain. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), some 332,000 total hip replacements are performed in the United States every year, highlighting that it is now a common procedure. Anyone who is experiencing debilitating hip pain and a loss of movement is a potential candidate for hip replacement surgery, but as with any medical intervention, the procedure may be unsuitable for some individuals. The really good news is that hip replacement surgery is now minimally invasive, meaning a surgeon can perform it with reduced pain; less muscle trauma; minimal scarring; and a smaller incision - all of which benefit the patient and afford a speedier recovery. You can find out more information about the hip replacement surgery options we can facilitate, including some of our partner clinics specialising in this procedure, on our website.

Arthritic Knees? Surgery Could be the Answer

03/11/2016

Many people have arthritis in their knees and the pain they experience makes walking even short distances a massive struggle. Furthermore, the pain can also occur even when they're not walking, which can make getting a good night's sleep almost impossible. And while some individuals get relief in the form of cortisone shots, lubricant shots and physical therapy, many others do not. It gets to the point, quite simply, where their knees need replacing. For people who have severe bone-on-bone arthritis and have tried and failed to relieve it using non-surgical methods, there's only one next step to take: knee-replacement surgery. The bottom line is that despite them offering some relief, techniques like bracing and PRP injections or stem-cell injections are unlikely to provide benefits in the long-term. The good news is that the technology used for knee-replacement surgery has come on leaps and bounds in recent years, and this has enabled less-invasive techniques to be utilised. In addition, surgeons are able to achieve better knee alignments and the knee implants themselves have a greater lifespan. When the pain becomes no longer bearable, most people turn to surgery for the answer. In our experience, the vast majority of knee-replacement surgery patients have significant pain relief and better function post-surgery. The key to recovery lies in the patient's motivation to work with their physiotherapist and their determination to regain both motion and strength in their knee(s). To find out how France Surgery can assist you with knee-replacement surgery in France, contact us today.

A Quick Guide to Cataract Surgery

27/10/2016

A cataract is a clouding of the eye's normally clear lens which can lead to diminished vision. And while the condition more commonly affects older individuals, people of all ages can get them. The good news, though, is that cataract surgery is a common procedure nowadays and statistics show that there is a high success rate of healthy vision post-surgery. In fact, uncomplicated cataract surgery can take just 10 minutes in some instances and patients can find themselves going home as quickly as 30 minutes after the procedure has been completed. Of course, as with most types of surgery, you'll need a friend or relative to help take you home afterwards as you'll be unable to drive. You'll also need to put drops in your eyes to prevent infection and may be advised to wear an eye shield to protect it while you sleep. Post-surgery patients are also told to avoid strenuous activities and not put their heads below their waistlines until the eye is completely healed. This takes around 8 weeks or so, after which time you'll be able to live a normal life once more - except with the benefit of rejuvenated vision. You can find out more about cataract surgery and see the clinics France Surgery utilises that specialise in the procedure here.

Gastric Surgery Should be Offered Regardless of Weight, Says Leading UK Surgeon

25/10/2016

A leading bariatric surgeon in the UK has urged the government to offer gastric surgery to patients regardless of their weight. According to Professor Francesco Rubino, the Chair of Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery at Kings College, thousands of type-2 diabetes patients in the UK are missing out on vital weight loss surgery because they do not meet the NHS's guidelines when it comes to weight. That's because, at present, only type-2 diabetes patients who have a BMI of over 30 are currently eligible for bariatric surgery. Rubino says that weight loss surgery is "the closest thing to a cure" and should be used more often. In the UK, there are around 3.6 million people with type-2 diabetes, which costs the NHS up to £10 billion a year to treat. However, approximately 15% of sufferers are "normal weight" and so don't qualify for weight loss surgery under the NHS's current guidelines. "The biggest barrier we have is primarily one of stigma against obesity. The vast majority of the public believes this is a cosmetic intervention and unfortunately many physicians think the same way," said Rubino. Rubino also highlighted that weight loss surgeries, which manipulate the stomach or small intestine, do not just help people lose weight, but actually influence insulin production by altering hormones in the person's gut. "More than 50% of people with type 2 diabetes can enjoy long term remission. Another 30 or 40% enjoy a major improvement," he added.

Study Finds Bariatric Surgery Decrease Gout Risk

13/10/2016

A study in Sweden has found that obese individuals who underwent bariatric surgery had a 34% less likelihood of developing gout - a condition that is often associated with and aggravated by being overweight. For the study, researchers analysed two groups of individuals: one which had undergone bariatric surgery and one which had followed intensive lifestyle modifications, including advice on food choices, energy intake and exercise. They found that over 26 years of follow-ups, there were 138 new cases of gout in the group that had undergone the surgery and 201 new cases in the matched, non-surgery group. Interestingly, the patients in the surgery group had higher body mass indexes; larger waist circumferences; and worse glucose and cholesterol levels. Speaking about their findings, the team, which was headed up by Lena M.S. Carlsson, MD, of the University of Gothenburg, said: "The beneficial effects of bariatric surgery are not limited to weight loss, but they extend to improvement in metabolic parameters and to lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer." Other studies have previously suggested that bariatric surgery can lead to lower serum uric acid levels, which are the primary cause of gout.

The Zika virus detected in the sperm

07/10/2016

                  A collaborative research team from Inserm, CNRS, University III Paul Sabatier of Toulouse and the University Hospital Center of Toulouse (CHU Toulouse) reveal today the presence of the Zika virus within the sperm. This reveal is the result of a real case study realized on Julien, a young man aged 32, recently returned from the French Guiana, who arrives at the CHU Toulouse, manifesting the representative symptoms of the Zika infection. Julien has moderate fever, rash, muscle and joint pain. Two days later, the Zika virus is detected in the plasma and urine of Julien. Eleven samples of sperm, ten of blood and five of urine are then collected and analyzed over a total period of 141 days. After analysis, it appears that Zika virus is found in all the samples up to the 37th day. After that, the virus is only found in semen, where it remains until more than 130 days, while the patient is doing well. The result was confirmed on two other patients to whom the virus has persisted from 69 to 115 days in their semen.   "We have detected the presence of the Zika virus within about 3.5% of the sperm of this patient" explains Guillaume Martin-Blondel, researcher and doctor in the service of Infectious and Tropical Diseases of the University Hospital of Toulouse. The discovery has already agitated the circles acting for the prevention of sexual transmission. "These observations, added Inserm, also raise many questions about the need to include the search for Zika virus when checking sperm donations in fertility centers." They also encourage the basic rule in case of sexual intercourse: protection first.   Source: La Dépêche   

Reasons to Choose France Surgery as your Treatment Partner

06/10/2016

France has the highest rated healthcare service in the world? (As rated by the World Health Organisation) Yet healthcare costs are often 4 times cheaper than similar services in the USA, Canada or other 1st world countries France is a welcoming, beautiful country and officially the most visited place on Earth As featured on CBS, Healthcare Elsewhere and the Medical Tourism Magazine We can open the doors to the highest level of healthcare for your company and your clients, whilst saving you money too! As our video shows, all of our services are delivered in fluent English and our client care begins right from the moment they touch down in France to the moment they board to fly back home again. Our treatment centers are especially selected from the high quality available across France to ensure your clients are treated only in the very best of our French treatment centers and by our top consultants. Our accommodation is always of a very high standard and, subject to medical agreement, we will ensure your clients enjoy their time in France and see some of our wonderful country too. If you would like to explore France as a treatment destination for your clients, please contact me on any of the options below. I'll be happy to introduce you to the very high standards of treatment we have access to and to the savings we can offer your company. Bien à vous ! Carine HILAIRE France SURGERY 22, Rue St Joseph 31400 TOULOUSE - FRANCE Office : +33 (0)9 53 02 03 09

France Surgery Attends WMTC 2016

29/09/2016

The 9th World Medical Tourism and Global Healthcare Congress in Washington D.C. drew to a close yesterday and what an event it was! A small team from France Surgery made the long journey over to the US. You may have seen France Surgery CEO and co-founder Carine Hilaire's Facebook post live from the event. The largest medical tourism event in the world, the World Medical Tourism and Global Healthcare Congress this year featured over 3,000 participants, 10,000+ networking meetings and up to 200 qualified buyers of healthcare, as well as industry forums and executive summits. Among the excellent keynote speakers at this year's congress was President and editor-in-chief of the Huffington Post, Arianna Huffington. Next year's World Medical Tourism and Global Healthcare Congress - the 10th of its kind - will be held October 2-4 2017, in Los Angeles, California. You can be sure that France Surgery will once again be there promoting all the benefits of the excellent French healthcare service. You can find out more about this year's event and get information ahead of next year's over on the World Medical Tourism and Medical Healthcare Congress website.

Tiny Pump Enables Heart Surgery on High-Risk Patients

13/09/2016

In December 2014, Port Arthur resident, Mattie Warren, 71, needed to undergo heart surgery. Her heart was failing fast, but because of blockages in her arteries which made her heart weak, she was deemed a 'high-risk' patient. Her physician, Dr. Kunal Sarkar, and cardiologist Dr. Murlidhar Amin had to find another solution. So rather than performing conventional open heart surgery, Sarkar decided instead to give Warren a protected percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using an Impella pump to relieve the pressure on her heart while he inserted a metal stent to clear the blockages in her arteries. Despite being on the market for more than 10 years, Sarkar said he only started using the Impella pump on high-risk patients when he arrived at the Medical Center of Southeast Texas around two years ago. Since then, Sarkar has successfully performed about 15 surgeries on high-risk patients using the pump. Smaller in width than a pencil, the Impella pump can be inserted via a small hole in the patient's leg and up through the aorta into the left ventricle. Now, two years later, Warren says she has the energy to work in her yard - something she could only dream of doing prior to her surgery. "Before the surgery, I would only climb my stairs every four months, and I would sweep my floor sitting down," said Warren.

Bariatric Surgery Best for Long-Term Weight Loss

05/09/2016

The benefits of weight loss surgery for obese and overweight individuals have been known for a long time. However, a new study now shows that the results of bariatric surgery are not just short-term, and much of the weight appears to stay off for at least 10 years. In fact, the study goes on to state that bariatric surgery is more effective than other surgical procedures and non-surgical techniques when it comes to weight loss and long-term weight management. Published in the journal JAMA Surgery, the findings are notable because they include the results of a decade-long follow-up, in addition to two separate areas of study. Lead author of the study Matt Maciejewski, who is a professor of medicine at Duke University School of Medicine, in Durham, N.C., said: “This study suggests that patients interested in bariatric surgery, especially gastric bypass surgery, should be able to lose a significant amount of weight and keep that weight off for a very long time." For the study, the researchers first compared thousands of veterans who had received bariatric surgery to another group that hadn't. After a year, the bariatric surgery group had lost 31% of their starting weight, while the other group had lost just 1%. After 10 years, the bariatric surgery group had managed to maintain a nearly 21% greater weight loss than their non-surgical counterparts, highlighting the long-term benefits that weight loss surgery can have. The researchers then looked into how effective different types of weight loss surgery are. They found that after four years, patients who had undergone a gastric bypass had lost nearly 28% of their starting weight, while those who a had sleeve gastrectomy lost about 18% and those with gastric banding lost about 11%.

iPads, Tablets Keep Kids Calm Before Surgery

30/08/2016

When it comes to lowering a child's anxiety before surgery, iPads and tablets can have as much effect as sedatives, according to preliminary research presented at the World Congress of Anaesthesiologists in Hong Kong this week. The French team behind the research conducted a simple experiment with more than 100 children (aged 4-10) and their parents. Prior to undergoing an outpatient surgical procedure that required a general anaesthetic, half of the children were given the sedative midazolam, while the other half were allowed to play games on an iPad. All patients and their families reported similar levels of anxiety relief ahead of the surgery. However, the parents in the iPad group said they were happier with how the anaesthesia process went. This sentiment was echoed by the nurses involved in the procedures. "Our study showed that child and parental anxiety before anaesthesia are equally blunted by midazolam or use of the iPad," said Dr. Dominique Chassard, study author and an anaesthesiologist at the Hospices Civils de Lyon in France. "However, the quality of induction of anaesthesia, as well as parental satisfaction, were judged better in the iPad group," he added. The French researchers did not offer any reasons for why playing games on a tablet was so helpful, but possible reasons range from them being a simple distraction to allowing the child to have an experience that feels less medical and, therefore, less threatening.

Britons under-reporting their calorie intakes - study

09/08/2016

Rising obesity levels in Britain could be attributed to the fact that may people in the country under-report their daily calorie intakes when quizzed for official surveys. According to research from the Behavioural Insights Team (BIT), policymakers who are attempting to curb obesity are being mislead by the British public when it comes to how many calories they are actually consuming on a daily basis. So while decades of surveys seemingly reveal that people are eating less - which should lead to lower levels of obesity - the truth is that people are not being totally honest when asked. The BIT's report, which has been compiled using scientific and economic data, shows that many people are eating up to 3,000 calories a day and not the 2,000 often cited in official surveys. As a result, government statisticians have already said that the way calorie data is collected will change going forward. But why would people deliberately under-report their calorie consumption? The BIT researchers don't believe that people are necessarily under-reporting their calorie consumptions on purpose. Instead, they point to the fact that snacks can difficult to track on a daily basis, which leads people to think they are consuming less calories than they actually are. Here at France Surgery, we have helped many individuals undergo weight loss surgery here in France. If you would like more information about any of our services, don't hesitate to contact us today for a free quotation.

5 things to do in France this August

04/08/2016

August in France - especially the capital city of Paris - is traditionally a very quiet time. That's because most of the locals shut up shop and head off on their holidays. But don't let that put you off. There's still plenty to do... Here are five things to do in France this August: 1. Paris Plages, until Aug 21 The Paris Plages is the French capital's beach festival, which sees the banks of the River Seine, Bassin de la Villette and the heart of the city transformed into beach paradises using 5,000 tonnes of sand. 2. Night of Stars, Aug 5-7 Across France, for three days, people are encouraged to "contemplate the sky" at over 300 bespoke events, which will attract both amateur and professional astronomers alike. 3. Rock en Seine, Aug 26-28 Rock en Seine is a three-day rock festival and Paris favourite. Held just west of Paris in the Domaine National de Saint-Cloud, Rock en Seine promises to be awesome this year, with acts such as Massive Attack, Chemical Brothers and The Offspring all headlining. 4. International Festival of Photojournalism, Aug 27-Sept 11 Held in southern France's Perpignan, the International Festival of Photojournalism is the biggest of its kind in the world, attracting around 230,000 visitors every year who come to France to see spectacular photos and the people behind them. 5. Festival de Musique, Menton, Jul 29-Aug 14 If classical music is your thing, the Festival de Musique in Menton is sure to be right up your street. The oldest classical music festival in France, the Festival de Musique has a rich and dynamic programme designed to appeal to wide range of people.

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