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Just one hour of brisk walking a week can really benefit people with osteoarthritis

02/04/2019

We’ve only just written about how a low-carb diet may help relieve symptoms of knee osteoarthritis and now a new study has revealed that just one hour of brisk walking per week can significantly lower mobility-related disability in people with knee osteoarthritis. According to the research, the findings of which appear in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, just one hour of weekly exercise lowered the risk of mobility-related disability in seniors with knee osteoarthritis by 85% and that of daily living disability by nearly 45%. For the study, a team of researchers from the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in Chicago, IL, led by Dorothy Dunlop, Ph.D., analyzed data from more than 1,500 adults. All of the participants were living with osteoarthritis and experienced aches, pain, and stiffness in their lower extremities as a result. However, none of them had a disability prior to the study. Over a period of four years, the researchers monitored the participants’ levels of physical activity. They found that the seniors who got at least one hour of moderate-to-vigorous activity each week had no trouble performing a range of daily tasks. However, in seniors who did not engage in this much physical activity, 24% could not walk across a street before the traffic lights changed, and 23% struggled to perform their daily morning tasks. Speaking about the findings of the research, Prof. Dunlop said: “We hope this new public health finding will motivate an intermediate physical activity goal. One hour a week is a stepping stone for people who are currently inactive. People can start to work toward that.”

A low-carb diet may help relieve symptoms of knee osteoarthritis

28/03/2019

If you or someone you know suffers with knee osteoarthritis, a new study may provide some hope. One of the most widespread forms of arthritis in the United States, osteoarthritis affects around 10% of men and 13% of women over the age of 60. Moreover, some estimates say it affects almost 40% of people over the age of 70. What’s worse is there is currently no cure, with doctors and medical professionals usually prescribing painkillers to help alleviate symptoms. Knee replacement surgery is also an option that’s considered. However, a new study led by Robert Sorge, Ph.D., who is the director of the PAIN Collective in the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Psychology, has found that a diet low in carbohydrates could help relieve knee osteoarthritis symptoms. Having followed either a low-carb or low-fat diet for 12 weeks, the 21 adults aged 65–75 who had knee osteoarthritis and participated in the study were examined to see what the effect had been. The participants’ functional pain levels were analyzed, as well as their serum blood levels for oxidative stress, both at the beginning of the study and at the end. Participants that followed the low-carb diet had reduced functional pain levels and levels of self-reported pain. Furthermore, they also showed less oxidative stress in their serum blood levels. Speaking about the findings of the study, Sorge said: “Our work shows [that] people can reduce their pain with a change in diet.”

New Stem Cell Program Offers Hope for Osteoarthritis Sufferers

26/01/2017

Even though around 7 million people in France and more than 70 million in Europe are currently living with osteoarthritis today, there is still no treatment capable of anatomically reversing the debilitating disease. To try to combat this startling reality, the European Commission has agreed to finance a four-year research program known as the ADIPOA project. Coordinated by Professor Christian Jorgensen, Head of The Clinical Unit for Osteoarticular Diseases University Hospital Montpellier in France, the ADIPOA project is a collaborative program bringing together 200 researchers from seven countries to work to validate a new concept of treatment based on stem cell therapy. Phase 1 of the ADIPOA project was completed in 2014 and the results were sufficiently encouraging to warrant a larger, multi-centre Phase 2b study, designed to further test the effectiveness of the treatment. ADIPOA-2, as it's known, will now build on the previous study's work and further assess the safety and efficacy of patient-derived stems cells in the treatment of advanced osteoarthritis of the knee. Professor Jorgensen said: "Ambitious as it sounds, we are aiming to deliver an effective treatment for the debilitating and incurable condition of osteoarthritis within as little as five years. We have arrived at this point because of a great deal of work by many scientists, clinicians and stem cell experts who have made enormous contributions in understanding the therapeutic potential of stem cells."

What is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

09/12/2015

According to the US-based Arthritis Foundation, arthritis affects more than 50 million people in the United States alone, which means that one in five American adults have some form of doctor-diagnosed arthritis today. But while osteoarthritis is the most common form of the disease and, therefore, the one that most people have heard of, rheumatoid arthritis should definitely not be overlooked or underestimated. Estimated to affect around 1.5 million Americans, rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease of the joints, which usually strikes after the age of 40 and affects three times more women than men. It’s classified as an autoimmune condition and people with the disease experience pain and inflammation as their bodies mistake the lining of their joints as foreign objects and attack them. While research has shown that smokers and people with a family history of the disease are more prone to developing it, the exact cause remains unknown, as is the case with many autoimmune conditions. The small joints in a person’s hands and feet are usually the first to be hit and the linings become inflamed and eventually the joint is eroded away. This is in contrast to osteoarthritis where the cartilage that covers the end of a bone is worn away due to wear and tear. Common rheumatoid arthritis symptoms include deformed joints and loss of function; numbness and tingling in hands and feet caused by nerve pain and a low red blood cell count. Carpal tunnel syndrome is also one of the complications that can arise from rheumatoid arthritis and surgery is often the only way to cure it.

Obese People Can Preserve Their Knee Cartilage by Losing Weight, says Study

02/12/2015

A new study presented at the recent Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting in Chicago, Illinois reveals that knee cartilage degeneration is significantly slowed in obese patients who lose a substantial amount of weight. Over 500 overweight patients were assessed for the study, which used an MRI scanner to measure the progression of knee cartilage degeneration, allowing the researchers to investigate the impact that different amounts of weight loss can have. The researchers discovered that patients who lost more than 10% of their body weight had slower knee cartilage degeneration, also known as osteoarthritis. The knee is one of the most common parts of the body to be struck by osteoarthritis and patients often need to have their entire knee replaced if the disease progresses too far. Study leader Dr. Alexandra Gersing, from the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging at the University of California-San Francisco (UCSF), said that while the effects of osteoarthritis cannot be reversed without surgery, “obese patients who lose weight can slow down the progression of cartilage degeneration in the knee.” The study was conducted over a four year period and involved over 500 overweight and obese patients. The researchers are now planning to conduct a further study, which will investigate how diabetes, which is closely linked to obesity, also affects cartilage degeneration. For the time being, however, overweight and obese individuals can slow their cartilage degeneration by losing weight. And while that’s not always as easy as it sounds, weight loss surgery is sometimes an option for obese patients to consider.      

Rotator Cuff

03/06/2015

ROTATOR CUFF Shoulder Surgery available in France   The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles (and their tendons) that are positioned around the shoulder connecting the upper arm (humerus) to the shoulder blade (scapula). They work together to help us with shoulder movement and stabilisation. The four muscles are: Teres minor Infraspinatus Supraspinatus Subscapularis Each muscle is inserted into shoulder blade and has a tendon that attaches to the upper arm and together they form a ‘cuff’ around the upper arm. This part of the body can often become damaged and inflamed due to injury, exercise, or general wear and tear over the years. The common name for this type of injury is Rotator Cuff Injury for which there are a number of treatments depending on the specific diagnosis. Injuries are typical of the falls on the stump or shoulder movements of abduction thwarted. These fractures involve the supraspinatus, the most often, but you can see breaks in the entire external rotator cuff: supraspinatus, the infraspinatus and teres minor. Arthroscopic repair of the tendons of the rotator cuff When repair of the rotator cuff is decided several operations will succeed: 1. Exploration of the joint: This exploration enables to confirm the lesions found with imaging tests (theMRI may well underestimate tendon lesions) Also look for the presence of osteoarthritis (cartilage wear) whose presence may explain part of pre-operative pain but also residual pain after an operation on the tendons. The biceps (also frequent source of pain) will be evaluated. The exploration will also include the space under acromial, often seat of intense inflammation (bursitis), looking lesions of the superficial surface of the tendons, of the aggressive nature of the acromion and the underside of the joint acromioclavicular. 2. Surgical procedures: The cleaning of the space under acromial is necessary to remove the thick, inflammatory and painful tissue, but also to see the top side of the tendons. Usually we practice acromioplasty to make the bone ceiling mild (nonagressive), the most common resection of the coracoacromial ligament (which extends the acromion forward and contributes significantly to the tendon conflict). Some surgeons (including the ones we are working with) will performe a gesture on the long biceps, which will simply be cut (tenotomy of the biceps) or reinserted to the humerus bone in or under the eaves (biceps tenodesis). Finally the acromioclavicular joint may be the place of intense inflammation also, often as part of early osteoarthritis, because of aggressive parrot beaks in contact with the tendons of the rotator. It is therefore the subject of minimum planing (co-planning) or even of a radical resection treatment of the last centimeter of the clavicle (removal of the diseased articulation). Advantages of the arthroscopy:  The arthroscopic exploration permits an almost complete view of the joint, a comprehensive assessment of tendon injuries. It allows to repair all types of tendon rupture. The approach of the tendons is minimally invasive and does not require muscle avulsion, alleviating the immediate aftermath and sometimes the type of asset.

Minimally Invasive Hip Surgery

23/01/2015

MINIMALLY INVASIVE HIP SURGERY Most of the orthopaedic surgeons you will be directed to, are specialised with minimally invasive hip surgery and have a great experience of these techniques. They routinely use minimally invasive surgery for primary osteoarthritis, osteonecrosis, etc. ... since 2005. Minimally invasive surgery is not just technical reducing the size of the incision, but a real non-invasive techniques without any muscular section. Compared to standard operations, minimally invasive hip surgery reduce complication's rate including a reduction (fewer of than 0.5% of dislocations) and patients benefit from a much faster recovery. This surgery is available in France at any age and with any degree of obesity. It is also suitable for sufferers of osteoporosis. Therefore a return to normal life can be expected within 3 to 4 weeks. Advantages of Minimally Invasive Hip replacement Surgery: Small Incision (3 to 4 inches) Reduced Pain Less muscles trauma Minimal scarring with a better looking scar Reduced risk of dislocation Faster recovery and more rapid return to normal life The hip replacement operation is one of the most reliable and well-tested operations in orthopaedic surgery and a consistent outcome is that it reduces or eliminates the pain of the arthritis in patients. Technique The artificial implants used for the minimally invasive hip replacement procedures are the same as those used for traditional hip replacement. Specially designed instruments are needed to prepare the socket and femur and to place the implants properly. The surgical procedure is similar, but there is less soft-tissue dissection. A single minimally invasive hip incision may measure only 3 to 6 inches. It depends on the size of the patient and the difficulty of the procedure. The incision is usually placed over the outside of the hip. The muscles and tendons are split or detached, but to a lesser extent than in the traditional hip replacement operation. They are routinely repaired after the surgeon places the implants. This encourages healing and helps prevent dislocation of the hip. To perform the two-incision procedure, the surgeon may need guidance from X-rays. It may take longer to perform this surgery than it does to perform traditional hip replacement surgery.

10 Reasons to Choose the French Healthcare System and France Surgery

01/09/2014

When it comes to your health, you can never be too careful. Furthermore, if you find yourself in need of a medical procedure like surgery, you want to be sure that you are in the safest possible hands. But with rising healthcare costs and seemingly increasing wait times, you can often be left feeling disheartened and like you have few options. You needn’t feel that way, however, as France Surgery are here to help facilitate affordable procedures, with little to no waiting times, all undertaken in one of the best healthcare systems in the world. Here are just 10 reasons why you should choose France Surgery: 1. The French Healthcare system is one the highest quality in the world 2. There are little to no waiting times for surgery in France 3. Procedures in France are highly affordable and can often be claimed back on insurance 4. France is the number one tourist destination in the world 5. The cuisine and beverages on offer in France are absolutely world-class 6. France Surgery have relationships with over 120 hospitals and more than 1,500 medical professionals 7. Five-star concierge services are available throughout your stay 8. All correspondence is in English and an English-speaking guide will be on hand for you 9. Luxury hotels will definitely feature in your recovery plan 10. Tailor-made packages are available such as sports injury recovery, post-traumatic, orthopaedic, dietetic/obesity, osteoarthritis/ rheumatism and cardiology, to name but a few Photo credit: © Minerva Studio - Fotolia.com

The Benefits of Minimally Invasive Hip Surgery

13/08/2014

Minimally Invasive Hip Surgery is an option for people suffering from worn or damaged hip joints, often caused by osteoarthritis - the most common disease of the joints. This minimally invasive technique allows a surgeon to perform hip surgery with specially designed equipment making just one or two small incisions, as opposed to the traditional method which involves making an incision of around 10-12 inches. Most of our Orthopaedic Surgeons at France Surgery specialise in this procedure which is not just about the size of the incision, but in fact about a full non-invasive technique without any muscular section, as there are significant benefits to the patient. The Benefits of Minimally Invasive Hip Surgery Smaller Incision (just 3 to 4 inches) Reduced Pain Less muscle trauma to the deep muscle tissues and underlying structure of the hip Minimal scarring Reduced risk of dislocation Faster recovery and more rapid return to normal life This operation is one of the most reliable and common in orthopaedic surgery with a positive consistent outcome of reducing arthritic pain for patients, and in some cases, eliminating the pain completely. Photo credit: © NICOLAS LARENTO - Fotolia.com

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