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Consuming flavonoids lowers risk of cancer, increases lifespan

20/08/2019

It’s widely accepted that eating more fruits and vegetables is beneficial to a person’s health. But now a new study has firmly and scientifically concluded that eating foods that are rich in flavonoids (like fruits and vegetables) could stave off disease and extend life. According to research by a group of scientists from Edith Cowan University, Australia, people who eat 500mg of flavonoids every day have the lowest risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease-related deaths. So how much do you need to eat to reap these benefits? Well, the scientists say it is important to get the flavonoids from a variety of sources. They say someone can achieve the 500mg of total flavonoids by consuming one cup of tea, one apple, one orange, 100g of blueberries and 100g of broccoli. Interestingly, the study of more than 50,000 adults found that the benefits of consuming 500mg of flavonoids daily were most pronounced in people who smoke and drink more than two alcoholic beverages every day. However, the scientists were quick to point out that consuming flavonoids does not enough to undo the harmful effects of smoking and high alcohol consumption. The study also found that consuming more than 500mg of flavonoids daily was not associated with any additional benefits. The paper appears in the journal Natural Communications.  

Compound found in frog slime destroys flu virus

19/04/2017

A compound found in the slimy mucus from a particular species of frog in India destroys the influenza (flu) virus, according to a new study published in the scientific journal Immunity. Researchers from the Emory Vaccine Centre and the Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Biotechnology in India say the frog slime destroys the H1 variety of influenza viruses. It's hoped that the discovery will lead to powerful new flu remedies being developed in the future. The frog, called hydrophylax bahuvistara, is a type of fungoid frog which was first discovered in 2015 and lives in the forests of south west India. It has an eye-catching orange stripe down the back of its body. For the study, the researchers collected secretions from the frogs' skin before releasing them back into the wild. They then began analysing the different chemicals found in the slime. They managed to isolate small structures that act as "anti-flu peptides", which were used to successfully vaccinate mice against the swine flu virus (Influenza A of H1). The peptides were found to not only blow up the virus, but also leave healthy tissue intact. Speaking to NBC News, Dr Jacob, senior study author and associate professor in microbiology, said: "This peptide kills the viruses. It kind of blows them up. There's no collateral damage." The team decided to call the flu-destroying compound urumin, after an Indian whip-like sword used in martial arts in the south of India called an urumi.

TURP - Trans Urethral Resection of the Prostate

03/06/2015

TURP - TRANS URETHRAL RESECTION OF THE PROSTATE The prostate gland lies just below the bladder. Urine leaves the bladder, passing through the centre of the gland, and then through the sphincter muscle to enter the ‘water pipe’ (urethra), to emerge at the end of the penis. In younger men, the prostate is the size of a walnut. However, as men get older, the prostate can grow to the size of a small orange due to benign (non-cancerous) growth. This tissue is called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This may result in a narrowing of the urethra and outlet to the bladder, giving rise to symptoms you may have. The surgery consists in removing the inner part of the prostate which was responsible for causing the narrowing of the urethra. The outer shell of the prostate is left behind. The operation, commonly called TURP (Trans Urethral Resection of the Prostate), involves passing a narrow metal telescope up your urethra through the penis. The inside of the prostate gland is cored out, using either a hot electrical loop or a laser.

TURP - Trans Urethral Resection of the Prostate

23/01/2015

TURP - TRANS URETHRAL RESECTION OF THE PROSTATE The prostate gland lies just below the bladder. Urine leaves the bladder, passing through the centre of the gland, and then through the sphincter muscle to enter the ‘water pipe’ (urethra), to emerge at the end of the penis. In younger men, the prostate is the size of a walnut. However, as men get older, the prostate can grow to the size of a small orange due to benign (non-cancerous) growth. This tissue is called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This may result in a narrowing of the urethra and outlet to the bladder, giving rise to symptoms you may have. The surgery consists in removing the inner part of the prostate which was responsible for causing the narrowing of the urethra. The outer shell of the prostate is left behind. The operation, commonly called TURP (Trans Urethral Resection of the Prostate), involves passing a narrow metal telescope up your urethra through the penis. The inside of the prostate gland is cored out, using either a hot electrical loop or a laser.

Clinique de l'Orangerie

20/08/2014

Clinique de l'Orangerie, Swiss Border, France

TURP – Trans Urethral Resection of the Prostate Surgery

13/08/2014

Trans urethral resection of the prostate (TURP) is a surgical procedure that is used to treat benign prostate hyperplasia, an enlarged prostrate.  When men are young and healthy their prostate will usually be the size of a walnut. However, this can increase to the size of on orange. If this happens then TURP can be used to remove a section of the prostate, the inner part which has caused the enlargement to occur. TURP is a usually carried out whilst you are awake but with a spinal anaesthetic such as an epidural, ensuring that you do not feel anything. This is a common procedure in France and consists of passing a thin metal telescope into the end of the urethra and against the prostate. An electric current is then used to heat the metal which is then used to cut away sections of the prostate. An alternative to using heated metal is the use of a laser. In France there are very few risks associated with this procedure. If you need this surgery and wish to have it carried out in a clean, safe environment with highly qualified doctors then France should be your first choice. With a recovery time of 2-3 days in hospital and a week before you can resume normal activities, what better place to relax and put your feet up than in the French climate. Photo Credit: © Alila Medical Images - Fotolia.com

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