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Heart Bypass Surgery: Restoring the Rhythm of Life

01/11/2023

The human heart, a relentless muscle responsible for pumping life-giving blood throughout the body, occasionally faces challenges that disrupt its vital work. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one such challenge, where the arteries supplying the heart muscle become clogged with plaque, reducing blood flow and oxygen delivery. In these cases, heart bypass surgery, also known as coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), emerges as a life-saving solution. Understanding Heart Bypass Surgery Heart bypass surgery is a surgical procedure designed to create new pathways for blood to flow to the heart muscle when the existing coronary arteries are significantly blocked or narrowed. These newly created pathways, often referred to as "bypasses," allow blood to circumvent the obstructed areas, restoring essential oxygen and nutrients to the heart muscle. When Is Heart Bypass Surgery Necessary? Coronary artery disease can lead to a variety of symptoms, including chest pain (angina), shortness of breath, and fatigue. While not all cases of CAD require surgery, heart bypass surgery may be considered in the following situations: Multiple Blockages: When multiple coronary arteries are significantly narrowed or blocked, bypass surgery is often the most effective solution. Left Main Coronary Artery Disease: Blockages in the left main coronary artery, which supplies a substantial portion of the heart, can be especially dangerous and may necessitate bypass surgery. Failed Angioplasty: In some cases, angioplasty (a minimally invasive procedure to open narrowed arteries) may not provide a lasting solution, and bypass surgery becomes the preferred option. Emergency Treatment: Bypass surgery is occasionally performed as an emergency intervention during a heart attack when other treatments are ineffective. The Heart Bypass Surgery Procedure Preparation: Before the surgery, the patient is given anesthesia to induce unconsciousness and ensure they feel no pain during the procedure. Incision: The surgeon makes an incision in the chest to access the heart. This can be done through a traditional open-chest incision or a minimally invasive approach, depending on the patient's condition and the surgeon's preference. Harvesting Blood Vessels: In most cases, blood vessels, typically the saphenous vein from the leg or the internal mammary artery from the chest wall, are harvested to serve as the grafts for the bypasses. Grafting: The surgeon then attaches one end of the harvested blood vessels above and below the blocked artery, creating a new path for blood to flow, bypassing the blockage. Completion: Once all necessary bypasses are in place, the heart is restarted, and the patient's chest is closed. Benefits of Heart Bypass Surgery Improved Blood Flow: Bypass surgery restores normal blood flow to the heart muscle, reducing the risk of heart attack and relieving symptoms of angina. Enhanced Quality of Life: Patients often experience a significant improvement in their ability to perform daily activities, leading to a better quality of life. Extended Lifespan: Bypass surgery can prolong the lives of individuals with severe CAD. Lower Risk of Future Heart Problems: By creating new pathways for blood flow, bypass surgery can prevent the progression of coronary artery disease. Risks and Complications While heart bypass surgery is generally safe and effective, like any surgical procedure, it carries some risks, including infection, bleeding, and complications related to anesthesia. There's also a potential for graft blockage over time, requiring further intervention. Recovery and Follow-Up Recovery from heart bypass surgery varies depending on the patient and the surgical approach used. However, most individuals can expect to spend a few days in the hospital, with a total recovery period ranging from several weeks to a few months. Rehabilitation typically involves cardiac rehabilitation, a program designed to help patients regain their strength, improve their heart health, and reduce the risk of future cardiac events. Final Thoughts Heart bypass surgery stands as a remarkable testament to the advancements in modern medicine. It offers a path to renewed health for those battling coronary artery disease, allowing them to regain control of their lives and live free from the constant threat of heart-related issues. As technology and medical knowledge continue to advance, heart bypass surgery remains a shining example of how medical science can mend even the most vital parts of our bodies, helping individuals reclaim the rhythm of their lives and look forward to a healthier, heartier future. For more information, visit our Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery page. *Image by Mohamed Hassan from Pixabay

A Brief Guide to Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

15/09/2014

When the most important organ in our bodies, the heart, becomes infected with disease or one of its arteries becomes blocked there is usually only one course of action: a coronary artery bypass. If you’re due to undergo heart bypass surgery or simply want to know more about what it entails, the following brief guide should answer many of your questions: What is coronary artery bypass surgery? It’s a surgical procedure which is undertaken to create a bypass around a blocked or diseased artery in your heart. How is it performed? The bypass itself is created using a piece of healthy blood vessel from another part of your body. The surgeon then attaches this to the healthy arteries in your heart ultimately bypassing the diseased or blocked section. Blood flow is significantly improved as a result. How long does it take? Between three and six hours is the usual amount of time taken for a coronary artery bypass to be undertaken. Is ‘open heart surgery’ the only way? Open heart surgery usually refers to the traditional method whereby a long incision is made down the front of the chest. However, it is becoming more common for the procedure to be undertaken on a minimally invasive basis through a much smaller incision. This reduces the cosmetic impact and inevitably speeds up the associated recovery time. What can be expected post-surgery? Because of the major nature of a coronary artery bypass, it is necessary for all patients to spend one or two days in intensive care. This will allow for vital signs to be monitored and reduces the risk of complications arising. Having just undergone such a major surgical procedure, you will need to take good care of yourself immediately afterwards. France Surgery’s experience and extensive partner network will ensure that you have everything you need for a successful and speedy recovery.

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