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Just 10 minutes of gardening each week could lower your risk of death

21/03/2019

If you’re over 40, just 10 minutes of leisurely activity each week could lower your risk of death from multiple causes. That’s the key finding from a recently published study by researchers from China and the United States. According to the study involving 88,140 US adults, even low-level physical activity, such as gardening, can help people live longer lives. Publishing their findings in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, the researchers said that even people who spend just a short time each week being physically active have a lower risk of death due to cancer, cardiovascular issues and all-cause mortality. However, participating in more vigorous types of exercise, including running and cycling, affords even greater health benefits. Unlike people who were physically inactive, those who undertook between 10 and 59 minutes of moderate, leisurely exercise each week had an 18% lower risk of death from all causes. Those who were physically active for a little longer (between 150 and 299 minutes per week) had a 31% lower risk of all-cause death. Undertaking over 1,500 minutes of physical activity on a weekly basis resulted in a 46% decrease in overall mortality risk. Furthermore, individuals who opted for more vigorous exercise instead of lighter physical activity had a much lower mortality risk still.

France Surgery and Sancheng Digital sign partnership

17/09/2018

Sancheng Digital, Europe to China marketing company and France Surgery, France's leading medical tourism company signed a partnership deal this week. The signing took place at TBSeeds - Toulouse Business School's start-up incubator.   (Sancheng Digital and France Surgery have strong links to Toulouse Business School, the founders of both companies having studied at the institution.)  Chinese outbound medical tourism is growing year on year as Chinese consumers seek to access medical treatment unavailable to them in their home country. Hanya Cao co-founder Sancheng Digital: "Sancheng Digital are excited to be working hand in hand with France Surgery to enable them to strengthen their position in the Chinese market." Carine HILAIRE co-founder France Surgery: "Sancheng Digital's expertise in China focused marketing made them a perfect business partner for France Surgery in our quest to build strong relationships with Chinese clients." Annexe: “Chinese outbound tourism figures continue to grow. Estimates show 500,000 outbound Chinese medical travellers spend at least $10 billion a year, lucrative for medical tourism destinations in Southeast Asia, Europe and the USA.” https://www.imtj.com/news/130m-chinese-holiday-abroad-outbound-medical-tourists-estimated-05m/ Sancheng Digital和France Surgery签署战略合作协议      2018年9月11日,Sancheng Digital 和 France Surgery 在法国图卢兹商学院创业孵化中心签署了一项重要合作协议。Sancheng Digital立足法国南部,致力于中欧贸易合作和国际市场营销服务。在协议签署后, France Surgury 将在其助力下进一步打开中国境外医疗旅游市场。     据报道,随着中国经济稳步增长,中国出境医疗旅游市场也成为各国看好的新蓝海。医疗体检和疗养旅游深受中国中产阶级青睐,除此之外,在癌症等恶性疾病治疗领域,欧美等国往往拥有更充足的医疗资源和更先进的研发治疗手段,因此也吸引着越来越多的中国患者前往海外接受治疗。      France Surgery的创始人凯莉.希拉里 (Carine HILAIRE) 说: "目前我们已经为许多来自欧美,中东,北非地区的病患提供了系列帮助,中国将会是我们的下一站,很高兴我们能和Sancheng Digital成为战略合作伙伴,相信在他们的支持下,我们能更好的了解中国病人的需求,推广法国的医疗旅游品牌,帮助更多中国病患在法国接受相关治疗,重获健康。"

France Surgery Visit to China

19/07/2018

C H E N G D U   H E A L T H   S E R V I C E    C H A M B E R   O F   C O M M E R C E    &      S A N Y I   M E D I C A L    C E N T R E   &   C H I N A   I N T E R N A T I O N A L   M E D I C A L    T O U R I S M   F A I R       O U R    D E L E G A T I O N    The French Medical & Health Delegation, comprised of Dr. Marc Giraud, co-founder of France Surgery and Dr. Jean-Patrick Lajonchère, the President of Hôpital Saint Joseph in Paris, travelled to Chengu, China earlier this month.  They were welcomed by Mr. SHI JUN, President of the Chengdu Health Service Industry Chamber of Commerce, together with representatives of JustGood Health Industry Group, Sichuan Southwest International Medical equipment city and Chengdu Yukang hospital.    This was a good opportunity to bound the Franco-Chinese partnership related to the medical and health industry, that was signed last November in Paris, when France Surgery, together with Mr. Philippe Douste-Blazy and the Hôpital Saint Joseph welcomed the Chinese delegation.   The Chinese tour also comprised a visit at the China International Medical Tourism (Chengdu) Fair and to the Sanyi Medical Center, where we've met esteemed professionals and future collaborators!  

Travellers risking fines and even imprisonment by taking medications abroad

14/06/2018

How often do you pack to go on holiday and include some prescribed medicines in your luggage? While it might not seem like a big deal, you could actually be breaking the law in the country you’re visiting and that’s why the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) is advising British citizens to check the rules ahead of time. Even painkillers that are commonly prescribed in the UK are classed as “controlled drugs” in some countries, which means holidaymakers could unwittingly find themselves in hot water abroad. In Japan, for example, some common cold remedies are banned, while certain types of sleeping pills require a special licence in Singapore.   The FCO warned that travellers could be slapped with a fine or even imprisoned if they break the rules. With nearly half of the UK population currently taking prescribed medication, millions of individuals could potentially fall foul of foreign laws. In China and Costa Rica, visitors are required to show an accompanying doctor’s letter with any medication they bring, while in Indonesia, codeine, sleeping pills and treatments for ADHD are illegal. The FCO recommends that travellers check destinations on its own website’s travel advice pages or the Department of Health’s TravelHealthPro website.

An egg a day to keep the doctor away?

24/05/2018

Most people are familiar with the phrase, ‘an apple a day keeps the doctor away’, but what about an egg a day? New research suggests that a daily egg may reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke. Despite sometimes getting a bad press for their high cholesterol content, eggs, it seems, could help us steer clear of cardiovascular conditions, according to research published in the journal Heart. For their study, researchers from the School of Public Health at Peking University Health Science Centre in Beijing, China analysed survey data relating to more than 500,000 individuals. Of those individuals, 461,213 were free from cancer, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes at baseline. Egg consumption among the study participants was noted and the individuals were followed up with after a median period of 8.9 years. The researchers' found that individuals who usually ate about one egg per day had a 26% lower risk of experiencing hemorrhagic stroke; a 28% lower risk of death due to this type of event; and an 18% lower risk of CVD-related mortality. Current NHS guidelines in the UK relating to egg consumption state: "although eggs contain some cholesterol, the amount of saturated fat we eat has more of an effect on the amount of cholesterol in our blood than the cholesterol we get from eating eggs". So, in other words, it’s not eggs that are necessarily the problem when it comes to cholesterol, but rather how you cook them. Indeed, eggs are a great source of healthful nutrients, such as protein, vitamins, phospholipids, and carotenoids.

French President Macron’s China visit seeks to boost trade relations

12/01/2018

French President Emmanuel Macron has just wrapped up his first official state visit to China – an event that experts say highlights his commitment to cementing positive relations between Beijing and Europe. One of the key messages conveyed during the French President’s visit related to the enormous possibilities and opportunities that exist for cooperation between China and Europe. Macron said that he is ready to work to “get the Europe-China relationship into the 21st Century” and will visit the country at least once every year while he is still the President of France. China’s president, Xi Jinping, said the two countries will look to deepen their “strategic cooperation,” a vision that was underlined by the fact the two countries signed a number of major trade deals during Macron’s visit, that included fields such as food, aerospace, online retailing and nuclear power. Macron also met with Alibaba founder Jack Ma, as well as a number of other officials from Chinese and French companies. He offered to open France to Chinese investment in exchange for greater access to China's markets for French companies. Talking about trade relations between the two countries, Alicia Garcia-Herrero, chief economist for Asia Pacific at French bank Natixis, said Chinese consumers have a growing hunger for what France has to offer.

Indulgent grandparents could be damaging their grandchildren's health

16/11/2017

It’s natural for grandparents to dote on their grandchildren and give them sweet treats whenever they see them. But new research suggests this and other influences could have a negative impact on their grandchildren’s health. For the research, the team from the University of Glasgow analysed 56 different studies which included data from 18 countries, including the UK, US, China and Japan. They focused on the influence of grandparents who were significant in their grandchildren’s lives, but who weren’t necessarily primary caregivers. Three areas of influence were considered: diet and weight, physical activity and smoking. When it came to their grandchildren’s diet and weight, grandparents were found to have an adverse impact, with many studies highlighting how they feed their grandchildren high-sugar or high-fat foods - often in the guise of a treat. The researchers also found that grandchildren were perceived to get too little exercise while under the supervision of their grandparents. However, this did depend on whether the grandparents were physically active themselves or not. Furthermore, smoking around grandchildren became an area of conflict between parents and grandparents, with the latter often smoking while their grandchildren were present, even though they had been asked not to. Talking about the findings of the study, lead researcher Dr Stephanie Chambers said: "While the results of this review are clear that behaviour such as exposure to smoking and regularly treating children increases cancer risks as children grow into adulthood, it is also clear from the evidence that these risks are unintentional. "Given that many parents now rely on grandparents for care, the mixed messages about health that children might be getting is perhaps an important discussion that needs to be had."

Smoking causes one in 10 deaths globally, study reveals

11/04/2017

In 2015 alone, 6.4 million deaths worldwide were attributed to smoking, according to a major new study, the results of which were published in The Lancet medical journal. Even more eye-opening is the fact that half of those deaths occurred in just four countries - China, India, USA, and Russia. The study by the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington in the US found a staggering one in 10 deaths globally is caused by smoking, despite decades of tobacco control policies in many countries. Furthermore, mortality rates could rise even more as tobacco companies aggressively target new, emerging markets. Interestingly, the number of people that smoked daily in 2015 was one billion (one in four men and one in 20 women), which is actually a reduction from the one in three men and one in 12 women who did in 1990. However, population growth has meant there were actually more people smoking in 2015 than 1990. "Despite more than half a century of unequivocal evidence of the harmful effects of tobacco on health, today, one in every four men in the world is a daily smoker," said senior author Dr Emmanuela Gakidou. "Smoking remains the second largest risk factor for early death and disability, and so to further reduce its impact we must intensify tobacco control to further reduce smoking prevalence and attributable burden."

France Surgery exhibits at the China Workshop in Paris

28/02/2017

Last Wednesday, France Surgery proudly exhibited at the fourth edition of the China Workshop in Paris. The event, which was held at the Hotel du Collectionneur, saw hundreds of French exhibitors and Chinese visitors brought together under one roof to promote tourism opportunities in France for Chinese nationals. While Europe has always been a popular destination for Chinese tourists, the China Workshop presents a unique opportunity for French companies and Chinese tour operators to get in contact and develop mutual business relationships. France Surgery spent the day forging new business partnerships and promoting France as a medical tourism destination for Chinese nationals. The China Workshop was a fantastic opportunity for us to speak face-to-face with people interested in our services and provide them with detailed information about the medical tourism opportunities that exist for them here in France. France Surgery is already looking forward to next year's China Workshop, which is sure to be another successful event. You can find out more about the event on the official China Workshop website.

France to invest 670 million Euros in genome sequencing

23/06/2016

The government of France is set to invest 670 million euros in setting up 12 bespoke centres for genome sequencing, which will help with the ongoing battle against cancer, diabetes and other rare illnesses. It follows the submission of a report to French Prime Minister Manuel Valls on Wednesday, in which health experts outlined recommendations for developing "personalised medicine". Recent developments in genome decoding have allowed suitable treatments to be developed for tumours that have resisted previous treatment attempts, and help patients benefit from cures for unusual diseases. Announcing the investment plans, French Health Minister Marisol Touraine said that some of the investment money will come from companies. When the first-ever DNA sequencing was started in 2003, it took over 10 years to complete at a cost of some three billion dollars. Nowadays, though, analyses of the most important of the genome can be completed in just a few days and cost as little as 1,000 euros. Experts say that DNA sequencing can uncover the disposition of individuals to certain complaints and provide insights into how they react to specific medications. The ultimate goal is to allow patients to find more suitable treatments more quickly. Google, Apple and Facebook are just some of the companies that have shown an interest in the sector, and China, the US and the UK have all already made similar investments.

Colistin-Resistant Bacteria Discovered in the UK

05/01/2016

When all other antibiotics fail, doctors resort to colistin. This important drug has been somewhat of a safety net in medicine over the years, but that could all be about to change now that bacteria that can resist it have been found in the UK. It’s a discovery that adds further weight to the warning from scientists that we are on the cusp of a post-antibiotic era, especially as similar resistance was found in China just last month. Doctors in the UK thought they had around three years before colistin-resistant bacteria spread from China to the UK, but checks carried out by Public Health England and the Animal and Plant Health Agency have now confirmed similar resistance on three farms and even in some human infections. Public Health England analysed all of the 24,000 bacteria samples it keeps on record and found that 15 of them, including some Salmonella and E. coli samples, were resistant to colistin. In separate tests, the Animal and Plant Health Agency found that colistin-resistant bacteria on three pig farms in the UK. While the discoveries actually aren’t that surprising, especially for scientists, they do highlight how very real the threat of untreatable infections is. The biggest concern is that the resistance to colistin will now find its way into other superbugs, which could make treating them virtually impossible. Professor Alan Johnson, from Public Health England, said: "Our assessment is that the public health risk posed by this gene is currently considered very low, but is subject to ongoing review as more information becomes available. "The organisms identified can be killed by cooking your food properly and all the bacteria we identified with this gene were responsive to other antibiotics, called carbapenems. "We will monitor this closely, and will provide any further public advice as needed."

Eating Spicy Food Regularly Could Extend Your Lifespan

02/09/2015

If you’re a lover of spicy food then we’ve got some good news for you. A new study suggests that your favourite spicy dishes may actually help lower your risk of death from certain conditions. Published in The BMJ, the observational study found that individuals who regularly consume spicy foods were at lower risk of death from cancer, ischemic heart disease and respiratory disease. The study focussed on 487,275 individuals in China aged between 30 and 79 who underwent regular health assessments. Between 2004 and 2008 the study participants were asked to complete a questionnaire about their general health and eating habits in regard to spicy foods, red meat, vegetables and alcohol. One of the researchers’ observations was that the individuals who consumed spicy foods three to seven days a week were 14% less likely to have died than those who didn’t. Furthermore, frequent consumption cut the risk of death from cancer, ischemic heart disease and respiratory disease, particularly among the female participants. Nita G. Forouhi, from the Epidemiology Unit at the University of Cambridge in the UK, says that further research is definitely justified. "Should people eat spicy food? It is too early to say, but the debate and the research interest are certainly hotting up," she said. So the next time you’re tucking into a dish that’s making your mouth burn and causing sweat to run down your face, remember that it could be helping to extend your life.

2014 Was the Year in Which 3D Printing Revolutionised Surgical Procedures

15/12/2014

Chances are you’ve heard of 3D printing before, but you did you know that it’s been revolutionising the way surgical procedures are carried out all over the world? In fact, 2014 has been a year in which 3D printing has really started to make its mark in the medical world. 3D printing itself is an additive technology which recreates objects using many thin layers and its application in medical procedures is exciting and wide-ranging. For example, surgeons were able to save the life of a 2-week-old baby back in July using a 3D-printed heart. Furthermore, a 3D-printed spinal implant was used in China to help a 12-year-old bone cancer patient walk again. Prior to the ground-breaking surgery he had spent two months lying flat in a hospital bed following a sporting accident that had injured his neck. And earlier this year a team of French surgeons were able to successfully implant a 3D-printed spine cage into a woman’s back with fantastic results. This technique is being championed as an innovative treatment for people with spinal instability and disc degeneration. It helps promote the growth of a solid composite structure from separate bones. This GizMag article contains more information about how 3D printing has enabled many other life-saving surgeries this year. For more information on surgical procedures in France or to get a personalised quotation, contact France Surgery today.

France Surgery: Getting Social in China

03/07/2014

Branching outside of our European confines, France Surgery have recently moved into the Chinese social media scene with profiles and activity on QQ and Weibo. China has an internet usage population of 591 million, so it’s no surprise that we see the benefit of getting social in this growing market. Both QQ and Weibo are comparable to Facebook and Google+, with users growing daily. We enjoy interacting with their users who are keen to find out more about France Surgery and our range of services. If you’re active on either one of these sites, connect with us! We’d love to hear from you and most importantly give you access to all our latest news and articles. Look forward to connecting with you soon!

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