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Brain implant could help Alzheimer’s patients live independently for longer

01/02/2018

Brain implant could help Alzheimer’s patients live independently for longer

Alzheimer’s disease is characterised by progressive memory loss and the deterioration of other cognitive functions. It is thought to affect around 5.4 million adults worldwide and, at present, there is no cure. As a result, treatment focuses on managing the symptoms and helping sufferers lead better lives.


However, a new brain implant could help people affected by Alzheimer's to live independently for longer.


A recent clinical trial at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Centre in Columbus investigated how deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy can help Alzheimer's patients. It involves implanting very thin electrical wires into the brain's frontal lobes and sending electrical signals, which are regulated by a device in the person’s chest, to stimulate the relevant brain networks.


Following the treatment, one long-term dementia patient, LaVonne, 85, can cook meals, dress herself and organise outings.


Speaking about the study, Dr Douglas Scharre, from the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Centre, said: "By stimulating this region of the brain, the Alzheimer's subjects' cognitive and daily functional abilities as a whole declined more slowly than Alzheimer's patients' in a matched comparison group not being treated with [deep brain stimulation]."


Further research will now be conducted to see whether the DBS therapy can be used in less invasive, non-surgical ways.

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