menu
FR | EN
Digital Healthcare Community
Certified Medical Tourism ProfessionalBest Medical Travel Agency 2015Best use of technology in Medical Travel 2017Certified Temos

‘Brain Training’ Good for Older People, says Study

05/11/2015

‘Brain Training’ Good for Older People, says StudyOlder people benefit from playing online games that test their memory and reasoning skills, also known as ‘brain training’, according to a large-scale study.

The six month experiment, which was conducted by researchers at King’s College London, involved almost 7,000 individuals aged 50 and over and was launched by the BBC’s Bang Goes The Theory.

None of the volunteers who participated in the study had reported any memory or cognition problems and they were recruited from the general population as part of a collaboration between the BBC, the Medical Research Council and the Alzheimer’s Society.

The researchers found that mental exercises, such as those undertaken during brain training, helped with everyday skills like cooking and shopping.

A baseline was taken by testing the study subjects on a series of medically recognised cognitive tests. The group was then split into two, with one subgroup asked to play online brain training games whenever they wanted for up to 10 minutes at a time.

The medically recognised cognitive tests were then redone at three and six months to see if the group which had been playing the online games displayed any detectable differences over the other group.

After six months, the group that had been playing the brain games showed broader cognitive skills than those who hadn’t.

Dr Doug Brown from the Alzheimer's Society said: "Online brain training is rapidly growing into a multi-million pound industry and studies like this are vital to help us understand what these games can and cannot do.

“While this study wasn't long enough to test whether the brain training package can prevent cognitive decline or dementia, we're excited to see that it can have a positive impact on how well older people perform essential everyday tasks."

Bigger, longer studies will now commence to dig deeper into this study’s findings.

 
expand_less